10 Better Sleep Tips

10 TIPS FOR QUALITY SLEEP THIS WORLD SLEEP DAY

We teamed up with award-winning Sleep Coach and Eve World sleep Day ambassador Max Kirsten, to help you master the art of quality rest and find 10 Better Sleep Tips.

Max says:

“A good night’s rest is invaluable for both mental and physical wellbeing, so good sleep practices are vital. By monitoring what you consume in the evening, clearing a busy mind and ensuring you have a comfortable and supportive bed, you can dramatically improve the quality of your sleep and regulate important body functions so you wake up feeling refreshed and engerised in the morning”.

Here are Max’s top 10 tips, vital for ensuring the quality of your sleep…

1. Reduce caffeine. Basically caffeine can keep you awake, and believe it or not stays in your body much longer than you would think, I recommend reducing your caffeine about eight hours before bedtime will help you fall asleep easier. You will find caffeine not only in coffee and tea, green tea and many carbonated soft drinks. Also be careful of eating too much chocolate which contains cacao (which acts very similarly caffeine as it’s in the same family). If you’ve already had too much caffeine, try eating carbohydrates like bread or biscuits to help reduce the effect.

2. Drink alcohol in moderation. Although alcohol may help you to fall asleep, it can also cause symptoms like dehydration, nightmares, headaches and sweats. If you must drink alcohol before bed, I recommend that you also drink water, but be careful not to drink too much water because that alone will have you waking in the night. Alcohol can interfere with your sleep architecture. During the evening drink less water. A glass of water right before bed may cause you to wake in the night disrupting deep sleep. In bed, I recommend the only sip water minimally as needed.

3. During the day get tired. It’s important that we use up energy, at least go for healthy walks whenever possible. Have a a 21st-century sedentary lifestyle were most of our time is spent sitting on a chair is going to lead to a slow unfulfilled energy feeling. Being active, and going, or doing something that pushes your physical body regularly to the limit means that in the evenings when you climb into bed you are ready to relax and let go. However going to the gym in the evenings before bed can increase your heart rate making it difficult to relax. in the evenings, if you must do something try stretching, yoga or a relaxing swim. Learn how to relax.

4. Control your environment to sleep. Ideally your bedroom should be dark, comfortable and quiet. Optimise and control your sleep environment (the bedroom). Evaluate your bed, and of course the mattress upon which a third of your life is being spent. If your bed is uncomfortable – too soft, to hard, or just unsupportive – invest in a better bed.  If you haven’t changed your mattress for between 5 to 8 years look into replacing it with something like perhaps an Eve mattress. Also the temperature of your bedroom for sleep should ideally become lower by a few degrees which has been shown to improve deep and restful sleep. The Bedroom for sleep should be as dark as possible, ideally switch off electronic devices. Ideally keep the TV out of the bedroom.

5. Reduce late-night exposure to blue LED light. Sleep research has shown that bluelight from smart phones, tablets, and computer screens reduces the production of the sleep hormone melatonin that is produced in the pineal gland in your brain. Blue light through the optic nerve tells your brain that it is still daytime. Either switch off all devices a few hours before bedtime. Television however is still fine, as the screen is far enough away so as not to cause this problem. Or get filter for your screen that reduces bluelight, I recommend f.lux. Or get some glasses that filter out bluelight instead.

6. Develop a good sleep routine. Ideally go to bed at the same time every night. Obviously there will be times when you break your routine, such as a late-night, or travel. It’s useful to begin to wind down work-related emails many hours before bed, take a hot bath, or if not a hot shower before bed as this has been shown to improve the speed at which you relax.

7. Avoid large heavy meals and alcohol late at night. Digesting a rich heavy meal makes it harder to fall asleep. Eat light and clean. Vegetables like tomatoes, fruit, even a bowl of cereal is better than going to sleep on an empty stomach which can also keep you up. Although alcohol in small doses can be helpful for sleep, the downside is that it also can interfere with your sleep architecture. Meaning that you will probably be waking feeling dehydrated in the middle of the night, so at least keep a little water by the bedside.

8. Clear your mind before sleep. If there is a lot on your mind get into the practice of writing things down so that there then the morning. Then when you turn out the light, learn techniques that help you to relax physically and then mentally so that you can begin to drift off. I recommend you take three deep slow breaths and after each breath relax your body and mind just before going to sleep.

9. Avoid exposure to disturbing films, gaming, and even watching the world News. These subjects can cause disturbance, anxiety, adrenaline and are not conducive to winding down and relaxing before bed. Ideally you should have sent your last email or text communications should.

10. Work out your pre-sleep routine. Poor sleep preparation can lead to having poor sleep. Research shows that taking a hot bath, is helpful, in fact better, more effective at helping you to relax than taking a shower. Feeling clean, with a hot body that cools slowly in bed with a wonderful feeling. Comfortable bedclothes, pyjamas or whatever makes you feel comfortable in bed, some prefer to sleep naked with a T-shirt. Some prefer sleep socks (low-cut socks) that help keep the feet warm during sleep – usually more for the older adults.

 

*Note: This post originally appeared on http://blog.evemattress.co.uk/10-tips-for-quality-sleep-this-world-sleep-day

Discover Sleep Insomnia Sleep Coaching with The Sleep Coach London

Sleep Insomnia breathing techniques

If you can’t sleep? If you suffer from sleep insomnia? If you just have difficulties falling asleep? Here are two simple breathing techniques that can help you to relax and begin to drift off…

Firstly, learn how to use the “4-7-8 breathing technique”.

The 4-7-8 sleep breathing technique

Originally developed and pioneered by Dr Andrew Weil in the US. The technique is very simple, in fact deceptively simple. It involves your breathing to various counts of 4, 7 and 8. It enables your lungs to fill with oxygen, and helps to calm the mind and to relax the muscles in your body, and your nervous system helping to reduce tension as you exhale.

This technique has been described as a natural tranquilliser. The technique is simple, takes almost no time, requires no special equipment and can be done almost ANYWHERE!

In order to do this technique correctly it’s important to understand that the key elements.

Firstly when doing the 4-7-8 breathing technique you will always be breathing in through your nose.

Then while you are doing this, you will have placed your top of your tongue against the front of your upper palate just behind your teeth, held against your upper gum. With your tongue held in position for 4 and 7 you will breathe in through your nose for four seconds, and then keeping your tongue in place, you will hold your breath seven seconds, and then with a “whooshing” sound you then exhale, pushing the breath out powerfully through your mouth for eight seconds. so that your lips make a “Phhhh” sound.

Then you will repeat the 4-7-8 technique again placing your tongue back against the back against the upper gum, and breathing in through the nose for four seconds, holding the breath of seven seconds your tongue still against the back of your upper gum behind the teeth, before releasing the breath with the wooshing sound “Phhhh…” from your mouth slowly for eight seconds.

*Note: you always inhaled quietly through your nose, hold and exhale audibly through your mouth with a “Phhhhhh…” whooshing sound.

Repeating this 4-7-8 breathing technique three or four times will be enough to relax and slow you down completely if done correctly. It helps to release all inner body tension.

Doing this in fact relaxes the para-sympathetic nervous system, the oxygen calming you, and helping you to feel more connected to your body – whilst at the same time distracting you from your everyday thoughts that can disrupt falling asleep.

This technique is also very good for reducing anxiety. Dr Weil says that if you practice this technique twice a day, for six weeks until you’ve mastered enough to be able to fall asleep in just 60 seconds.

Here’s another simple breathing technique to help you fall asleep. This one is called the Bumble Bee sleep technique, it’s very simple but really only works if you sleep alone as you’re likely to annoy or disturbed whoever is with you whilst doing it.

The Bumble Bee Sleep Technique.

This technique is very simple, easy to do, and really quite extraordinary.

1, You just close your mouth, and breath in through your nose.

2, Then while keeping your mouth closed, you then hum like a bumblebee as you breath out through the nose for as long as possible for about 5 mins.

The vibration that you create whilst humming and exhaling both at the same time is very relaxing to the nervous system. It can help reduce your blood pressure, and help rebalance serotonin levels, you will begin to feel more relaxed. It also helps you to stop reacting to all your thoughts.

The Bumble Bee Sleep technique helps change your brain waves from lifestyle busy beta moving towards relaxing nourishing theta brainwaves. This is definitely the most unusual breathing techniques that I have ever found to help you to naturally fall asleep and overcome any insomnia. Research says that if you practice this for at least five minutes continuously, the body’s nervous system will start to settle down. Most people don’t sleep because they are “overthinking the overthinking”, and are unable to unwind and relax with a busy mind.

These two techniques I hope will be enjoyable and useful for Zzzz…

I wish you a great night’s sleep.

Max Kirsten

Max Kirsten guide to getting a perfect night’s sleep

 

Sleep Insomnia London

 

 

The Sleep Coach and Hypnotherapist explains how to sleep without counting sheep.

Anxiety and sleep are not great soulmates. This means that when we’re regularly confronted by a global climate of anxiety, as we are at the moment, increasing numbers of people start the day feeling exhausted.

I know this is happening because in recent months more of my clients have been seeking help for sleep problems.

It’s time to make some changes, not least because poor sleep damages our health – one consultation in ten with a doctor relates to sleep difficulties.

A recent five-year study by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health indicated that people who suffer from anxiety as a result of stressful events can have disturbed sleep for at least six months afterwards. Feeling irritable and unable to concentrate, common symptoms of sleep deprivation, are unhelpful.

If you’re tempted to count sheep, take note of last year’s report by Oxford University scientists who found that imagining a relaxing scene is considerably more effective. But first I’d like you to take some practical steps to create an environment that will induce a relaxed state of mind.

  1. Make sure you’re tired

A child who has been running about will sleep better than one who has been playing computer games. The same is true for adults. Regular physical exercise counteracts depression and anxiety – as studies have shown – and helps you to sleep. You don’t have to work out – a brisk walk, some gardening, a swim or a bike ride are all beneficial. If you’re less mobile then do some gentle stretches.

  1. Create a sleeping room 

You need an atmosphere of peace and quiet. TVs and computers are not conducive to sleep: keep them out of the bedroom. You need curtains or blinds to make the room dark and it should be ventilated. If you have an uncomfortable mattress make changing it a priority.

  1. Dealing with worries

Don’t talk about your anxieties just before you go to bed. Do something relaxing instead, like reading, listening to soothing music or have a bath.

  1. Get up early

Set an earlier wake-up time on your alarm. Research has shown that consistently getting up half an hour earlier than usual helps to reset faulty sleep patterns.

  1. Things to avoid before bed 

Caffeine less than five hours before. More than a glass or two of wine. Nicotine – including patches and gum. The late news or any action, suspense or horror film.

How Alcohol Affects your Sleep

According to new insomnia sleep research, one in seven of us (and one in four insomniacs) are using alcohol as a sleep aid. Though reaching for the bottle may be an easy way to fall asleep, alcohol before bed can be detrimental to getting a great night’s sleep.  Even at comparatively low levels, the more that we drink, the more alcohol affects our sleep and how we feel the following morning.  Here’s why.

Natural Sleep vs. Alcohol Induced Sleep

Most of us would agree that a few drinks seem to help us fall asleep just fine. However there is a massive difference between falling asleep under the influence of alcohol, and falling asleep naturally which will in fact result in a much better night’s sleep.

Alcohol Disturbs Your Sleep Pattern

Though alcohol has a sedative effect, it interrupts what we call your ‘sleep architecture’. This is the pattern of sleep your brain waves follow overnight. And, it’s by sticking to this pattern that we end up feeling refreshed in the morning. It involves getting the right balance of REM sleep (dreaming sleep) and non–REM sleep (including deep sleep).

Sadly, alcohol disturbs this pattern. Alcohol enhanced sleep means the brain is no longer able to perform its natural restorative processes.  Instead of balancing out, the portion of non-REM sleep increases, while the portion of REM sleep decreases. But, the real problem begins during the second half of the night, when your REM sleep reduces. At this point, your sleep becomes much more disturbed. You may not feel it at first, but when the pattern breaks, you’re heading into a restless night of tossing and turning.

Other Negative Effects

Additionally, alcohol increases your body temperature, dehydration, and feelings of restlessness.  This is down to the toxins produced by the body – as it tries to break down the alcohol in its system. Alcohol can also cause breathing problems overnight. Even small amounts of alcohol can result in slower breathing.  The lining of your throat becomes more swollen, and the muscle tone in your airways is reduced.  As a result, breathing problems including snoring, and sleep apnoea are much more likely to set in. The oxygen deprivation that results can cause you to feel heavy and un-refreshed in the morning.  It can also lead to unwanted weight gain as your metabolism slows down.

Alcohol Before Bed = A Slipery Slope

Some sleep specialists claim that having a single glass of wine before bed is a good approach for insomniacs (but not for the general population). Though this approach may be beneficial for some people with severe sleep problems, I would argue that it’s a ‘slippery slope’.  Think about it. The more alcohol you drink regularly, the more your body becomes immune to alcohol’s sleep inducing qualities. The benefits eventually wear off, leaving you to deal with just the negative impact it has on your sleep. 

Natural Sleep – The Best Kind of Sleep

The best type of sleep involves the natural processes of your brain and biological sleep cycles. It is very different to the sedative state induced by alcohol, which suppresses the natural activity of your brain. So if you want a refreshing, wonderful night’s sleep, it’s best to avoid that nightcap!

As a sleep coach, I recommend learning my completely natural ‘ABC of better sleep’ technique. It teaches you to relax sequentially, and give up ‘trying’ to sleep. Learn to let go of your thoughts, and drift off naturally into deep, refreshing sleep. You can learn more about the ABC sleep app here.

I wish you a great night’s sleep.

Max

10 things that stop a good night’s sleep

No one wants poor sleep, difficulty falling asleep, waking repeatedly in the night, or having chronic insomnia. If going to sleep has become something that you dread, here are 10 things to keep in mind and to practice before turning out the lights.

Work out your pre-sleep routine

Most of us enjoy getting ready for sleep. But, poor sleep preparation can lead to having a restless night.

So here are some things that you can do.  Research shows that taking a hot bath is very helpful.  In fact, it’s more effective at helping you to physically relax than even taking a shower. Feeling clean, with a hot body that cools slowly when you get into bed, is a wonderful feeling, and should help you to settle after a hard day of work.

Snuggly bedclothes, pyjamas, an old t-shirt or whatever else makes you feel comfortable (hey, you’re never to old for that favorite stuffed animal!) will also help.

If you are prone to cold feet (most older adults are), sleep socks (low-cut socks) are also a good option, keeping your feet warm during the night, without cutting off your blood’s circulation..

Uncomfortable bed and/or pillows

If your bed is uncomfortable – too soft, to hard, or just unsupportive – invest in a better bed.  Now you’re probably going, “Max!  Why would I throw my hard earned money at something I’m simply going to lie on, doing nothing for hours?” Well, the answer is that we spent half of our lives in our beds, recharging our batteries so we can perform to our best ability each and every day of our lives.  So if you can, you better treat yourself to a good one! It’s a health investment!

Find the right pillows. Not all pillows are the same, so find the ones that work for you – you’ll be glad that you did. Some people even like to travel with the right pillow as part of their ‘sleep religion’. Hotel bedrooms rarely feel as comfortable as your one at home (although they might smell fancier), so bringing a few supplies with you can make the difference between an ‘OK’ night and a great night’s sleep.

 

Too much light

Light can be really impairing when it comes to sleep. Whether it’s from street lights outside your window, or your blinds letting in morning light, light makes it harder to fall and stay asleep. A good pair of curtains or blinds that block out light is ideal. Even the light from your digital clock can make your sleep erratic.  Ideally switch electronic devices such as mobile phones off, or set to silent, some even have a sleep setting.

A disturbance, argument, unresolved issue, anger

Most of us know that having a disturbed mental state before bed will usually result in a poor night’s sleep. Techniques such as writing things down, list making, discussing it with someone, talking it through, all help to process the disturbance, event, argument, unresolvable issue, what have you. If none of this works, remember, tomorrow is another day.

Exercise just before bed

With the exception of bedroom love-making (of course) intense exercise such as a late-night gym session, can have a negative effect on sleeping.  This is due to your heart rate and metabolism being increased, making it harder to unwind in bed later. It is always better to do exercise in the day or early evening.

An uncomfortable or noisy environment

Noise is a big interference when it comes to sleep.  An old boiler, your neighbor’s dinner party, the student rave upstairs, a domestic argument in the street, doors slamming, floor boards creaking, traffic, ambulances, or just the noise of your partner snoring, can all stop you from obtaining that beautiful, well deserved, night’s sleep.  These noises are often even louder in the summer when the hot weather forces us to leave our windows open. Although not ideal for every night, I recommend having a good pair of earplugs (foam, silicone, wax earplugs, there are many different types) to help tune these sounds out and lock into a good night’s sleep. NOT all earplugs are the same, so shop around.

An irregular routine

Sleep research shows that most people benefit from keeping to a regular sleep routine. The body’s natural circadian rhythm responds best to regular day/night routines. Obviously if you are a shift worker, or an international traveller crossing time zones, your body’s natural clock will not be working as it wants to. Research also shows that most of us are getting less sleep than our predecessors.  This is probably due to all the extra stimuli, such as 24-hour TV, the Internet, computers and smart phones with blue light (read my blog on the matter here). Most of us could do with going to bed an hour earlier, and certainly our health would improve as a result.

Stimulants – coffee, alcohol, food, nicotine

Sleep is often impaired by stimulants such as coffee.   Most people should have their last cup 5 to 8 hours before hitting the pillow. Other caffeinated drinks such as tea, fizzy drinks, and even eating chocolate late at night (cocoa is a stimulant just like coffee) can also affect your sleep.  Certain foods, which are particularly rich and difficult to digest should be avoided altogether before bed. Many people are still surprised that alcohol, which may seem a good idea before bed, inevitably leads to waking in the night, dehydration and restlessness!

Finally, let’s not forget ‘ye’ old classic’: the cigarette. Nicotine is in fact a powerful stimulant so it can often reduce deep sleep quality (particularly if nicotine is absorbed without tobacco’s other ingredients). Now, we have nicotine with a twist – as it’s often now ‘vaped’ with the ever increasing use of e-cigs. As a result, nicotine is absorbed directly into the body in a much purer form, and often at a much higher dosage.  This makes sleep more difficult, and leaves the user exhausted, and un-refreshed after a night of crazy dreams in the morning. Much better to drink a little water, and eat healthy natural foods that are easy to digest, before jumping into the hay-sack.

 The wrong body temperature

A bedroom that is either too hot or too cold can make sleep less comfortable. Ideally the room and your bed should reach body temperature. Then, as you’re falling asleep, your bed should be cozily warm, and the air in your room slightly cool to the touch.

A busy mind

Of all the things that can stop you having a great night’s sleep, a busy mind can be the worst. Sleep is for sleeping. Of course, a little time preparing for sleep, and relaxing in bed to process the day’s thoughts is healthy. But, when you’re ready to sleep, letting go of daytime thoughts, and allowing yourself to relax and let go is key. Some of us, particularly the light or anxious insomniacs, need some help to learn how to get ‘out of the way’ of our sleep.

Seek help for sleep

As a certified sleep coach, and as a self-confessed fully recovered insomniac, I love to teach techniques, and practical tips that make falling asleep effortless and delicious.

However if you live far away, thanks to modern technology, you can now access and download my 2 sleep apps, the ‘ABC of better sleep’, and my ‘Insomnia cure’. Both of these contain wonderfully relaxing ambient recordings to drift off to…

I’m proud to say these hypnotic sleep audio programs have won a number of sleep awards!

You can find them on my website thesleepcoach.co.uk or on iTunes – search for Max Kirsten to find all my apps for the iPhone and iPad.

I wish you a great night’s sleep.

Max

How to Avoid Blue Light Insomnia

 

sleep_coach_blue_light

According to recent research, blue light technology is now being slated as one of the main causes of insomnia.  The more time we spend on our iPhones, iPads, or Kindle Fires – all devices which emit blue light – the harder it is to get a good night’s rest.  As wonderful and convenient as these blue light devices may be, avoiding them could be the key to beating your insomnia.

It’s All Down to Blue Light Technology

Believe it or not, sleep was much easier to get before the digital era arrived. However, new research from Penn State and Harvard University has proven that people who regularly read electronic books and stare at blue light screens before turning the lights out sleep for less hours!  They are also more prone to experience periods of insomnia.

This is down to the blue light emitted from these devices, which interferes with the body’s natural circadian rhythm – a ‘fancy’ term for the internal mechanism which synchronizes with the Earth’s 24 hr rotation.  This ‘body clock’ is regulated by our senses, and most importantly regulated by the amount of light that passes through our eyes. When this light travels up the optic nerve to an area in the brain known as the pineal gland, it works to regulate melatonin, the hormone that induces sleepiness.  Any imbalance in this special hormone will cause restlessness in sleep, as well as insomnia.

Blue Light Interferes with the Ages of Sleep

The pressures of modern day living, alongside the use of blue light devices, simply makes it harder and harder for us to fall asleep – or even stay asleep. This is because blue light impairs the effectiveness of the stages of sleep; In fact, it is particularly detrimental to REM sleep which is in charge of storing memories.  Studies carried out by Penn State and Harvard University (US) – published in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences – support this, showing that screens really can have an extremely powerful effect on the body’s natural sleep pattern.

How to Avoid Blue Light Insomnia – Real Books and Less Technology

Therefore, it is becoming much more clear that if you wish to get a great night’s sleep – but enjoy reading a good book before bedtime – a real book with printed words will help you sleep better than any electronic device. In fact, I believe that limiting the use of blue light devices to at least 3 to 4 hours before bedtime is even more helpful when trying to avoid insomnia.  I also believe that televisions, mobiles (and their chargers), as well as all other electronic devices should be kept out of the bedroom – or at least switched off completely before bedtime.

Blue Light is the Enemy of Sleep

As a sleep coach, I am seeing more and more people with sleep difficulties, caused by worry, anxieties, stimulants (i.e. coffee, nicotine, cigarettes and e-cigs), alcohol, and now blue light circadian rhythm interruption ( Wow! Try saying that five times!) to top it all. Though blue light has been a positive breakthrough in computer screen technology blue light IS the enemy of sleep.

 

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the_sleep_coach_blog

So, now the clocks have gone forward. Most people will know that when the clocks go forward we actually lose an hour of sleep time as I was saying in my previous blog. However, having spent all of last week advising people how not to get caught out by the summer solstice, beginning of British summer Time, I have tweeted, broadcasted on half a dozen radio stations, mentioned it here, there and everywhere!

But now last night as the moment of truth arrived in my own household was I ready? Authenticity, congruency, walking the talk, did I set my clocks, my watch etc an hour ahead a few hours before I went to bed? Yes I did it ….so I’m not a hypocrite! I even went to bed an hour earlier than usual (although my watch said that it was the usual time) and I have to say that I slept well and woke feeling reasonably refreshed.

One of the reasons why I practice as a sleep coach is that I have had personal experience of chronic insomnia and having overcome my own sleep difficulties naturally, helping others to learn to sleep well naturally is one of my life’s greatest passions. Addictions to Zopiclone, Ambien Valium etc etc… is just not the way!

Late Rooms

I was looking at some sleep research put together by laterooms.com who I’ve been consulting for over the last few weeks and it amazes me that 45% of us regularly sleep less than six hours per night. Learning how to go to bed an hour earlier will improve sleep times and your health.

There is real research that shows that if we are able to sleep one hour more than usual, that the improvements in overall health and well-being and cognitive and motor functions is a no-brainer.

One of the reasons why many of us have poor sleep is that our partners snore. Why suffer? Find a good pair of earplugs! Do your research as not all earplugs are the same. There are a earplugs for men and earplugs for women, who tend to have narrower ear canals. There are even earplugs that knock out almost all noise and earplugs that filter out only part of the sound spectrum. There are earplugs attenuated for fulltime parents (so that you can still hear the sounds of small children and babies, but not so much the sounds of rumbling traffic).

Another problem is light. Too much light in the bedroom can interfere with the production of melatonin. This hormone is produced naturally in the Pineal gland which helps the body in many ways to sleep, restore balance and the healing process. Get a good set of blinds/ curtains or at least purchase a good quality sleep eye mask. Again not all eye masks are equal – it’s worth shopping around and doing your eye mask research.

Considering how many hours a night we spend, or need to spend sleeping ideally well, it amazes me how few people take the time to find the right bed, pillow, bed linen, sleep mask, earplugs etc etc…

As a self-confessed sleep nut, the research needed for a great night’s sleep is worth every wonderful Zzzz…

the Sleep Coach

When I created ‘The ABC of better sleep‘ as a downloadable app I wanted to teach people to use my ABC sleep technique anywhere in the world. I also included a number of ambient recordings that are rather wonderful to drift off to sleep with but then I realised that as a sleep training programme there was still something missing. I wanted to create something that was so relaxing and delicious that will help you to drift off and fall asleep using my ABC technique that went deeper and deeper… and didn’t count you back up again to waking consciousness. Something really to fall asleep with, whether at night or just for an  afternoon nap. So that is the difference between ‘The ABC of Better Sleep‘, and my second app called ‘The Insomnia Cure.’

But ultimately, I believe in teaching how to fall asleep naturally without potions, headphones, apps or anything else. To give up trying to sleep, which is always the first mistake. Great sleepers never try to sleep, they just fall asleep naturally!

Instead of trying to sleep learned to relax. To relax your body and then your mind. To become so relaxed that, even if you’re not asleep yet, you reach a point of being so relaxed you don’t even care. And when you’re that relaxed your body is getting what it needs while you relax, and drift in and out, until you drift off…

Learn to let go of letting go.

Wishing you a great night’s sleep every night.
Zzz…

Max Kirsten Read more